Social Recruiting: Is the hype over yet?

Gartner HypeNext week I head to the US for the Social Recruiting Summit a one day extravaganza being held at the Googleplex in Mountain View. But as I sit here in wintery Melbourne pondering the future I am wondering when Social Recruiting will fall off the top of the Gartner Hype-curve? It will fall the trick will be to ensure that it does not get stuck in the Trough of Disillusionment.

Social Recruiting is going through a similar phase as cloud computing, I drew this conclusion after reading the McKinsey paper on Clearing the air on cloud computing. Lots and lots of talk, hype and tremendous promise but technical and operational issues are hampering wide spread usage within large enterprises.

Let’s look at McKinsey’s recommendations to stabilise the cloud computing discussion and apply it to social recruiting.

  1. Get an industry definition on social recruiting, Riges Younan and John Sumser have been having a discussion on this over at SocialRecruiting.com
  2. Figure out how to get around the hurdles for adoption in large enterprises; Financial, Technical, Operational and Organisational.
  3. HR/Recruiters should focus on ensuring their operational service delivery is excellent instead of creating unrealistic expectations that social recruiting will save them.
  4. Everyone should take solid actions to limit the time in the trough, recruiters show clear ROI, technology vendors enhance integration, HR develop strategies.

More on this later.

Four quick thoughts

I have been meaning to write an earth shattering post here for a while, but I guess that will have to wait a bit longer. In the meantime here are four quick thoughts to keep you going:

  1. Honesty in a resume is important even when your brackground is not the most attractive, Drug Smugglers Resume.
  2. Want to quickly monitor your personal brand? Here are three tools to help you get started.
  3. Work in a large company? Then follow David and Gareth on their quest for the perfect ERP.
  4. Finally when a mainstream consulting firm like McKinsey starts using hashtags to discuss Web 2.0 you know you need to get involved.

Change management and technology implementation

For many years I have felt that change management has been one of the most underrated and overlooked component during technology implementation. (For the IT folks out there I am NOT talking about change control I am taking about the people and organisation aspects.) I have been involved in change management from several perspectives and as part of my consulting now offer services are change management. Given this I felt I should probably get some formal training, over the last few days I have been completing the APMG’s course in Change Management.

As a bit of background there is significant research out there to back up the position that if you don’t have change management your technology project will more than likely fail. Some of the more recent studies are:

  • A 2002 McKinsey study found that ROI of projects was 143% when change management was used and only 35% when it was not.
  • “Projects with excellent change management programs met or exceeded objectives 88% of the time, while projects with poor change management met or exceeded objectives only 17% of the time,” stated Tim Creasey, Prosci’s Director of Research and Development and co-editor of the 2007 report “Best Practices in Change Management”
  • Kotter found that only 15% of organisations making transformation succeed.

Watch for more posts in the coming weeks on change management.