Best places to work as voted by you the employees

For the second year in a row Glassdoor has published their Best Places to Work listing based on votes by the employees of these organisations. Basically wisdom of crowds to determine the 50 best employers in the US. The terms of reference were:

The Top 50 were selected from more than 37,000 companies reviewed by the nearly 100,000 employees who completed a 20-question survey on Glassdoor.com in 2009. To be eligible for the list, a company must have had at least all of the following:

  • 25 reviews from United States-based employees between January 1, 2009 and December 1, 2009,
  • “satisfied” ratings overall and across all categories, and
  • a CEO with at least a 50% approval rating.

The top 10 employers based on the Glassdoor survey are:

  1. Southwest Airlines
  2. General Mills
  3. Slalom Consulting
  4. Bain & Company
  5. McKinsey & Company
  6. MITRE
  7. Boston Consulting
  8. Continential Airlines
  9. Procter & Gamble
  10. Juniper Networks

Which is an interesting list as it looks very little like the Fortune Best Companies to Work For top 10:

  1. NetApp
  2. Edward Jones
  3. Boston Consulting Group
  4. Google
  5. Wemans Food Markets
  6. Cisco Systems
  7. Genetech
  8. Methodist Hospital System
  9. Goldman Sachs
  10. Nugget Market

If we compare the lists side by side you can see how different they are, the numbers in brackets indicate where the company appears on the other list, if at all.

Glassdoor Fortune
  1. Southwest Airlines (-)
  2. General Mills (99)
  3. Slalom Consulting (-)
  4. Bain & Company (-)
  5. McKinsey & Company (-)
  6. MITRE (66)
  7. Boston Consulting (3)
  8. Continential Airlines (-)
  9. Procter & Gamble (-)
  10. Juniper Networks (84)
  1. NetApp (15)
  2. Edward Jones (24)
  3. Boston Consulting Group (7)
  4. Google (14)
  5. Wemans Food Markets (-)
  6. Cisco Systems (-)
  7. Genetech (-)
  8. Methodist Hospital System (-)
  9. Goldman Sachs (16)
  10. Nugget Market

While yes the lists were compiled at different end of the year the Fortune list at the beginning Glassdoor as of December 1, they do should how different two lists can be. Even if you compare the Glassdoor results from 2008 the Fortune list is still rather different. This tells me that just relying on external lists to determine the top employers is dangerous practice.

The key is to know if your employees are engaged and telling others that your company is a great place to work. This is a critical first step in the creation of successful talent management strategies, such as referral programs.

Are your offer letters keepsakes?

Something I get asked a lot is “How does social media impact the HR department?”

There are lots of ways, including areas that crosses into the recruiting; attraction, branding, onboarding and closing the deal.

Do your offer letters engage future employees like this?

All kidding aside, any company that can give this much attention to detail just in their HR paperwork should be fun to work for.  I am looking forward to this new adventure.

How about something someone would never throw out?

I don’t think I’ll ever throw this out. It’s a keepsake that reminds me of the major move I made from Toronto to San Francisco and all the sacrifices made and opportunities gained.

Or make your experienced hire feel “like a kid on Christmas morning”?

Enter the Apple Job Offer.
ioffer

(Via Glyph)

These are the feeling expressed by Glyph about his current Apple job offer and Justin Reid’s historical offer.

Just imagine how engaged your new employees will be if they feel proud enough to photograph your paperwork and describe the “tension on the hinge of the folder is perfect: not too tense, not too loose”! Let’s not over look the complete alignment of the above offer packages to the corporate culture of Apple.

Unfortunately onboarding processes are a frequently overlooked part of both recruitment and HR processes.