Jamie Oliver TED Prize Winner

“I wish for everyone to help create a strong, sustainable movement to educate every child about food, inspire families to cook again and empower people everywhere to fight obesity” – Jamie Oliver

I posted the 20 minute video of Jamie Oliver this year’s TED Prize winner over on Inspecht TV but wanted to cross post here as well. In the video he shares stories from his anti-obesity project, specifically food in schools call for an all-out assault on obesity. At one point he shows a classroom full of young children who do not seem to know what some of the most common vegetables even look like!

What struck me was only this week here in Australia burger chain Hungry Jacks has admitted to breaking advertising rules that limits the advertising of high fat foods to children. The reason? Contractual obligations to the “US-based licensor of The Simpsons which specified how and when the children’s meal promotion was to be advertised.”

Now just think of the workplace impacts in 10 to 15 years when all these children start suffering type 2 diabetes and requiring time off for medical treatments! (Yes I had to connect this to the blog in some way.)

The future of recruiting technology

I have been thinking a lot recently about the future of recruiting technology. While social networking is all the rage at the moment it is not new, and was first seen as a recruitment tool at least two to three years ago if not longer.

So where to next?

I usually look at future technology trends with two view points, the Gartner Hype Cycle and Chris Anderson’s, from Wired Magazine, four key stages of technology viability.

First let’s look at the Gartner Hype Cycle. 

Hype Cycle

According to Gartner the visibility of new technologies peaks early with lots of hype and excitement, followed by a “trough of disillusionment” where inflated expectations hit reality. It is at this time when fundamental changes in both what the technology does and how we use them takes place. Sometimes technology does not survive but as the technology begins to prove itself we see it being used productively.

The trick it to know where a technology is on this curve. For example social recruiting, “peak of inflated expectations” or “slope of enlightenment”?

The second approach I have been thinking about was provided by Chris Anderson at TED in 2004 where he talked about technology collisions as a way of assessing its viability. The four collisions he lists are:

  1. Critical Price
  2. Critical Mass
  3. Displacing another technology
  4. Commoditise, nearly free

For example, job boards are moving toward being a commodity. Using free software anyone can create a job board for a community in about 24 hours.

Following FutureSummit I am also looking at the future in the terms of MegaTrends. The two trends of note here are the Rise of Asia and Connectivity. With connectivity, while social networking is all the rage now we don’t grasp what is going to happen as mobile connectivity really takes off. Could this mobility in social networking change influence?

So I have three attributes to consider now for technology each with their own factors to consider. I suspect somewhere in the mix is the future, now if I can only find it.

Trend Influences