Would you charge a job applicant for an interview??

Sounds rather strange doesn’t it, charging applicants to interview with you.  It is usually the other way around, employers paying for flights, taxis, accomodation to entice employees to work for them.

Well not for low cost Australian Airline Jetstar who are charing applicants $89 for the interview process.  This does not even cover the cost of the medical if the applicant is successful.  According to the article in The Age:-

Airline spokesman Simon Westaway said the $40 fee for a personality test and $49 for a security check for job applicants was “a cost recovery process”.

Maybe they feel that their brand and the attraction of being a flight attendant outways the cost?

8 thoughts on “Would you charge a job applicant for an interview??

  1. I think the fact that you have to sit in a chair low to the ground while some large and mean man stares at you imposing questions which you find difficult to answer is a good-enough scare away from being hired, but in today’s world, where jobs are hard to come by, I would think this would hurt companies more than help them. Because, afterall, who is willing to spend their life savings travelling out to a job they may not get hired to do?

  2. I think you are right on the money Jessie. As the job market increases in size employers are going to have to work at attracting employees and asking them to pay to interview just won’t cut it.

  3. Interesting ploy. On one hand it makes sure they get candidates who are very serious about working for them. On the other hand, it pretty tough on the people who are unemployed and struggling to get a job.

    At what point in the process do you have to pay?
    Can you opt our after the interview?

    This may in fact contravene the ILO international labour standards to which Australia is a signatory.

  4. Employers are tranfering their employment cost (in many areas) to the employee and we can blame the wonderful HR departments for that and the employees in those companies for not complaining about it. Talking to HR in many companies I have worked for, their standard reply is “we are not as bad as other companies”. Rather than saying it is the wrong/right thing to do. That is another reason why having the option of joining a union is so important. HR should be renamed CR becasue at the end of the day we are all just company resources and the human side is fading fast if not disapppeared

  5. ky, is it really just the HR department or is HR delivering what is requested by management, ie cost reduction in this case? I agree in many lesser organisations the human side of things is disappearing I would hope that this is in the minority of cases.

  6. It’s a long time since I looked at the ILO stuff, but what I do know is that ‘for profit’ employment agencies are not allowed to charge people for procurement of work. Maybe they never expected employers to charge people for an interview!

    ILO standards aside, there must be some EEO issues here. If you’re unemployed and living on the dole you probably can’t afford to risk $80 on an interview.

    Given the size of Jetstar, and the value an employee will contribute over time to the organisation, this is a very petty approach and sends an apalling message to prospective employees.

  7. Michael
    I think in many cases it is HR delivering what the company is asking for i.e. cost cutting. But the question HR need to bring up is “is it right”, “will it look bad if the employee take legal action”,…etc. HR is sometimes to eager to please they forget there are people involved. For example I worked for a multinational company which decided to offer better financial conditions on overseas assignement if you’re legally married. The company believed they were within the laws but my manager pointed out that if any employee should take them to court for discimination, is the bad publicity worth it??

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